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. experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains also looking for a possible pulonium concentration. the samples will be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france, and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yassir arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says. because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him, as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course, i am against it, he says. it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused israel of being behind any poisoning of arafat. a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it's not clear if pelonium can be traced eight years after the palestinian leader's death. but if heightened levels are found, the next
the experts from russia, france, and switzerland join the palestinians in taking specimens of yasser arafat's remains. they're going to study those specimens in their laboratories in their countries. they say it will take three months to get a full result. and then they'll know how he died. now the claims that he was murdered, if he was murdered, he was poisoned, became -- well, you know, for eight years, no one really dealt with the issue until al jazeera tv earlier this year did a documentary reporting that they have confirmed that he died of poisoning of plutonium 210, the same allegedly used to kill a spy turned can dissident. if he was poisoned with with mew tone yum, who did it? if it turns out he was poisoned, they need to find out who did it and that's a whole different investigation. i guess it becomes a criminal investigation as opposed to this kind of medical examination. >> and, martin, who is doing this investigation right now? who is in charge of this decision to exhume his body? >> reporter: well, you know, there was great pressure after that al jazeera documentary on arafat'
to climb out from under russia's thumb and sign a deal with a new gas partner. okay. this deal was a big deal. over $1 billion and what it was going to do was have the company build a new port terminal on the black sea for importing and exporting liquefied natural gas. the signing of the agreement was such a big deal in the ukraine it was televised. it was attended by the prime minister and by a man called jordy sarda bonvehi representing the company. huge step toward energy independence and a big bird to russia. one big problem. the company doesn't know anything about it. turns out that jordy doesn't actually work for that company. he's the bald gentleman in this shot. take a good look at this guy. we don't know what his real name is. it appears he's a con man who was able to get through multiple rounds and rounds and rounds of negotiations and a televised appearance for a $1 billion deal without detection. i mean, that's kind of incredible. you have got to give the guy that. in fact, on the surface, this seems like a mirror image of one of the most infamous swindles in history, when vi
enough. they are going to climb out from under russia's thumb and sign a deal with a new gas partner. okay. this was such a big deal, it was televised and attended by a man representing finosa. a big bird to russia. it was just one big problem. gas natural finosa didn't know anything about it. it turns out that he doesn't actually work for that company. he's the bold gentleman in this shot. take a good look at this guy. we actually don't know what his real name is. it appears he's a con man who was able to get through multiple rounds and rounds and rounds of negotiation and a televised appearance for a billion dollar deal without detection. i mean, that's kind of incredible. you have got to give the guy that. in fact, on the surface, this seemed like a mirror image of one of the most infamous swindles in history, when victor lustig sold the eiffel tower to two company. years later, he even pulled a scandal on al capone. yes, he swindled al capone out of $5,000 in money. how's that for inflation in that takes a lot of brass and a lot of smarts, which is something that our new con man
-day for palladium, supply concerns out of russia and south africa, also supportive of the platinum market. if you want to play these metals as a retail investors, look at the etfs. >>> to the action here at the nyse, bob pisani here on the nyse floor. last words out of your mouth were much better that yesterday. what kind of steady as she goes? >> even on the vans decline line. volume is light to moderate a heck of a lot better that yesterday. best volume in a long time. and a very strong european close. that was the big factor, big speculation again about spain being involved in perhaps the ecb coming and buying spam nish bonds, all vague speculation but helped the spam nish close and the european close. here is sector up today for the first time this month, utility stocks. they have been slammed on speculation on the fiscal cliff, of course, dividend payers have to pay higher taxes, the first time, sue, in nine trading sessions, the utilities on the upside a lot of the big utility names you see down 7, 8%. some of this, some of it is due to hurricane sandy but much on speculation on the fiscal
of this -- also the building of international coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- for romney, obama's regas overseas, his inability to stand up to this
coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- weaknessy, obama's overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china
: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc news white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the republican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. suddenly being blamed for everything. the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone...but her likes 50% more cash. but i'm upping my game. do you want a candy cane? yes! do you want the puppy? yes! do you want a tricycle? yes! do you want 50 percent more sh? no! ♪ festive. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? ♪ lou:
.s. intelligence has identified three command and control servers. one is in russia and one in the states that are sending commands to this virus and the u.s. intelligence has now at a later concluded with a high degree of confidence that this virus was developed by state-sponsored actors in excess land, and not in the high degree of confidence that there is a shadow out there that they have another target and that this virus is not going to stay on the leal companies that could move -- oil companies that could move. if you want to start? >> i think so, given the "washington post" sources we don't have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think one, the general realization that we have not seen everything yet sold, second, typical of the cyber type of activities they are probably most crippling in undermining confidence over the public so they need courses of action to address this in the public and how they will do this we haven't really gotten the sense of the external overseas type of the implications from the standpoint of other damage out there. we need to know from the intelligence
israel and the moss. no doubt about it. lou: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc nws white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the reublican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. we use this board to compare car insurance rates side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i pluggein snapshot, and 30 days later, with snapshot, i knew what i could s
us, hey, russia, if you look up to the moon now? watch now. boom! fantastic. >> dana: that is what they call a blue sky brainstorming where you are in a situation room. what could we do? no idea is bad idea. you won't be judgeed by bad idea. >> brian: my feeling is this is similar to trailing in a pickup basketball game by sin surmountable margin. you'd go just promise you won't tell anybody. because i don't want someone bringing it up on a talk show it's my idea to blow up a moon! >> bob: you go back on the court to play. >> andrea: if you look at when this was dreamed up weren't you in government? this sounds like a bob beckel idea. we'll just blow it up. >> bob: there was a 470-pound woman kicked off three flights because she was too big for the seat. he is died of kidney failure. should he is be denied seats? >> eric: the couple flew from america to hungary. they couldn't get the seat belt on and booked another flight and there was a problem with the seat belt. was it safe for her to fly? they felt it wasn't. she got off the plane and die died. >> dana: he is couldn't get to he
hd hasn't rolled out in turkey and russia. it's a big hedge for us. >> thank you for being here. >> appreciate it very much. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, david faber and jim cramer. we kick off the week better than we had seen last week. looking at a higher open across the board after the worse weekly losses with both indices closing below the 200-day moving average on friday. looking at the action over in europe, we are seeing small gains across the board. our road map starts on capitol hill where congress returns to work tomorrow as leaders prepare to meet with the president this week on the fiscal cliff. lawmakers over the weekend sound optimistic that a deal will be reached. how likely is that? >> jeffries gets bought in a $3.7 billion deal. leucadia is described as a mini berkshire hathaway. >> a war to see who will open earliest on black friday or on thanksgiving itself as it turns out. >> first up, after coming off the worst week for the markets
is about $740 billion. the defense budget of every other major country on earth, including russia and china, combined, is $540 billion. you think we're all right? i don't know. i think so. if you really want to dig in, we said, how many contractors do you have? what do you do? oh, i'm a contractor with the defense department. or it might be the guy who makes something for 50 cents and sells it for $2. what's the range on contractors? it's between 1 million and 10 million. we'd like an audit. could we have an audit of who they are and what they do? i was a military guy. i was in for a couple years in germany. they have their own health care plan called military retirees. only 2.2 million of them. that's not a big cohort. many of them have never been in combat. they have their own health care plan. the premium is $540 a year with no copay. it takes care of all dependents. there are 61 department of defense schools still in america from wars long past to take care of dependents. they're right next to a bus ride for a public school. they all have a superintendent and principals and teachers and
, specimens of his remains are going to be sent to three labs, separate investigations in russia, switzerland and france where they will be investigating looking for traces of polonium or any other kinds of poison. to answer that question, how did arafat die? because there was never any public report of his medical report. his wife kept it secret. no one knows what really led to his death although they know he had a stroke. that's the issue, how did he die? the suspicion is, he was poisoned. the fingers pointed at israel. now maybe we'll find out. the scientists it will take them about three months before they have their results. israel's convinced they'll find natural causes. sorry. >> i was just saying, you and i remember, you better than anyone, from being there, and i remember covering the funeral, that there had been a lot of talk about arafat's being ill, his weakness, about his leadership, but it really is fascinating that in the intervening years and intervening eight years, the palestinians have divided between hamas and fatah more critically and really is a vacuum of leadership. >>
into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr. clash believes this lawsuit has no merit. a fast-moving storm is going across the mid-atlantic today. heavy rain, sleet and snow is hitting several stalts from west virginia to massachusetts. hundreds of car accidents have been reported throughout the region. many schools have closed. the powerball jackpot just got sweeter. the prize for tomorrow's drawing -- it's tomorrow? we have to get a ticket. it's now a reco
errors. that's not how we got here. otherwise you'd have something like soviet russia, built from top-down. >> we took some of the key stressors from the markets that are out there. and there are a number of them these days, certainly. we'd like you to go through and tell us whether they're fragile, robust or antifragile. start with the fiscal cliff because it is what everybody on wall street is watching. is it fragile, antifragile or robust. >> for me it is a good thing because the economy requires once in a while to be shaken and people to be scared. otherwise we got trouble. sort of livg theke equivalent o forest that hasn't had forest fire in a while. you need once in a while to jolt the market so people realize that there is something wrong and we have to do something about it. and we need these fiscal cliffs and similar situation to shake politicians. >> because they have no skin in the game according to you. >> that is a big problem. there's some category of people who have the up side and no downside. and effectively, they have -- the downside is borne by us april 15, tax day.
of the palestinian leader's belongings. now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible concentration. the process will only take a few hours but samples will then be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yaszer arafat remains a powering figure for palestinians. but denight wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. >> translator: i don't support the process this man says because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> of course i'm against it, he says. it is insulting to martyr and to the palestinian people. >> reporter: the palestinian authority accused israel of being behind poisoning of arafat, a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if it can be traced on the remains eight years after the palestini
in power and maintain control over at least part of syria and that of course is russia and iran and the result would be al-assad steven pour and the victory which is not going to be good for our simultaneous efforts to try to move iran to the negotiating table to seize the nuclear weapons, and in white portions of syria, a no-man's land rather like the fata of somalia where the militants perhaps probably associated with al qaeda would find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage in putting in beijing through military means if necessary the merkley or indirectly through providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more and we need to do more urgently or this is great to slip out of control. at best -- and it isn't very good at sifry at salles -- at worst we are going to see any emerging sunni shia fisher across the middle east would be followed by violence and fighting in iraq and elsewhere. let me touch on iraq. it hasn't received too much commentary either in the debates in the campaign or even some
this week at a zoo in russia. unfortunately, their birth mother abandoned them, so this shepherd dog stepped in to nurse the little cubs. it's not been the first time the tiger mom refused to feed her babies. it happened five months ago when she gave birth to two cubs. the zoo staff was prepared this time, brought in the dog to help, and the little cubs, well, they are happy campers. arthel: i mean, as if pictures weren't enough, the vocals just kill me. i love it so much. very nice. jon: yeah, that's mom. mom doesn't look too happy, but the cubs are happy. arthel: tsa why we love dogs -- that's why we love dogs. thanks for having me. jon: it's been fun having you here today. i guess now we have to go shopping, right? arthel: yes, we do, and what are we eating? grass-fed beef. jon: see you later on the fox report, 7 p.m. eastern tonight. thank you for joining us. arthel: "america live" starts right now. rick: and we begin with a fox
@megyn kelly in between now and the court. this one is not so funny. off we go to russia and new worries about the world's worst nuclear nightmare. more than 25 years after the meltdown at the chernoble tpaoubg lar plant workers in the soviet republican of ukraine are beginning to build a giant cap over the facility's still dangerously actor. trace gallagher has that story live from l.a. >> after the disaster the first reaction was to try and cap the radiation, right, to kind of contain it. so what they did is they built this concrete unit around reactor four. at the time they called it the 10,000 year tomb. it turns out the shelf life of that was only about 30 years, which is up in four years, so now they are in the process of building a new structure that looks kind of like a giant kwan sit hut or an ark. about as tall as the stat you've liberty. the plan is to kind of slide this thing using railroad tracks overreactor number four and then begin to dismantle the reactor. one of the big concerns you have is they have that big smokestack or chimney on reactor number 4. they have to tear that t
! wow. i've he never seen anything other than in soviet russia to see this kind -- >> jim, jim -- >> what? david? >> is it too early to buy groupon? >> i've been debating that, and zynga. >> what is amazing, it wasn't that long ago, this company came public, marketed as a great growth stock. as melissa just said, there is no growth anywhere. it takes you back to a number of the ipos we know quite well, zynga, groupon, facebook to an extent, linkedin, this group never should have been public. before it went public they did that final round, raised $900 million and google was willing to pay them $6 billion for that company but they wouldn't pay it now. >> wow, wow. >> unbelievable. josh brown, frequent guest on "the halftime" today said they have destroyed 10 billion of a $12 billion original cap. this ipo was a war crime. >> a war crime? >> invokes nuremberg. >> have you mentioned, evercore going to $2 price target -- >> he starts by saying we missed our revenue expectations by meeting our operating profitability? wow. meeting what? meeting what? fiscal cliff. >> here on "squawk
about going to war with russia. he had -- he had a lot of ingredients to him. larry hagman was not just the star of "dallas." >> i think people forget about that, and sadly, this is the kind of moment when people are reminded how powerful a person or how far-reaching they are, sadly at their passing. you talk about how he was a big advth of trying to kick the habit, trying to get you to kick the habit. he tried to help so many others. you forget about the "i dream of genie." he was in "nixon" as well as well as playing j.r., which was the big iconic character that i think everyone really remembers. i think most people think he kind of embodied j.r. how different from j.r. was he, since you knew him? >> he was very different, fredricka. another thing about him, he was intense. on the smoking thing, when -- he had the day, my birthday many years ago, he called me. i didn't smoke all that day, and he would call me every half hour. i was in washington. he was in l.a. he was persistent. he would go around with a little fan, a little fan, if you smoked, he blew the fan at you. >> to try to bl
, are at stake here. and that's why this is so difficult for us. >> and -- >> -- like russia. and interesting timing for all of this, right, between this and ehud barak's, interesting to watch. jamie rubin always nice to have you with us. coming up at the top of the hour we're going to talk more about what's happening in the middle east with dr. hanan ashrawi of the palestinian liberation organization. >>> still ahead on "starting point," you know all that confetti that was raining down on thanksgiving day parades. wasn't that fabulous? well, actually, it was very sensitive information. oops. social security numbers, things like that. >>> also, the man who played one of the most beloved characters in movie history, peter billingsley, ravel if i, ta ral, talks about the new musical. we're back in just a moment. ti . because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your pur
to use the kind of diplomacy that i think would be highly desirable, to find a way to work with russia to work out a deal to go forward. i just want to make that point that paula also made. as wonderful as all the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with tools. we will need to confront the situation, and i think the moment is here. it is overdue. it is extremely urgent to find a way to end the killing in syria. it sets a terrible example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere if we do not act. >> we are going to have to wrap it up pretty soon, but we will take two more comments. >> thank you. in the australian high commissioner in ottawa. i am standing in for my defense secretary, but it is quite fun for me, if not for him. i want to make a point, having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner. particularly in my part of the world, indochina, asia, jakarta, our part of the world has different views. we know what has happened in china. thailand has sufficiently grown to no longer be a recipient of foreign aid. similarly, indonesia, which will sh
at the expenditures and the resources by china, by russia, by others -- >> uh-huh.. >> -- and what for them is one of their biggest concerns? well, it's the u.s. and not only national security secrets, but increasingly commercial secrets. much of that which can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. and it's a dire threat. and i think that in part because so much of our intention, so much of our resources were spent in the counterterrorism arena, we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence. and that's an important element of this. a big one. >> often i've heard some people have been involved in counterintelligence say it tends to be seen as a little bit of the red-headed stepchild in the intelligence world. >> uh-huh. >> why is it that when we need it, and what's the cure for it? >> i think in part because it's something we don't want to think about. it's very unpleasant to think that our agencies or our businesses have been penetrated by a foreign power, by a criminal organization, and we'd rather think about, well, how do we achieve that goal, a foreign policy goal or a pro
with syria and russia. this is just over an hour. >> i am going to be very brief in introducing our two panelists. i think they are -- i am also going to be in the discussion, for which jonathan promised me two cookies instead of one, for doing double duty. i am not going to say anything substantive about this panel other than looking at the u.s. side of things and the regional side of things, they mesh very well and they also mesh with the first panel. i think we all know jeffrey. the founding director of the thornton center and the senior director at the nfc under president obama for the first two plus years i guess. he has written, by the way, a wonderful book accounting that time, which i think is probably available in the brookings bookstore, and which is probably a great read. jonathan is the current acting director of the thornton center, somebody i must say that, on a personal level, when he was out in the wilds of california, some place beyond the appellation, i think, i used to turn to his right things to understand what was going on in northeast asia. i did not know him, but
in early 1945. the war is winding down. russia has beaten back germany and crippled them in stalin grad, places like that. what long-term effect, shor short-term effect, did roosevelt's weakness/illness in it dealing with stalin have on all of this? >> it had an enormous effect. one of the things you see when you read the transcripts, this part of the world was not of much interest to roosevelt at that point. he was interested in the u.n. that he was trying to set up, interested in the war in japan and one interesting moment where he said there's one polish city that this been polish before the war. they were arguing about the borders. maybe you should leave it in poland. he says to stalin, let's leave it in polllanpoland. stalin seems to agree. and thus to the fates of millions of people get decided and this is now in ukraine. but it was a kind of lack of interest, lack of focus in the last meetings of roosevelt and stalin. >> a seemingly crass question that i always ask historians when they're on the show. people do these books about topics that have been written by academics for a lo
keep us reliant on foreign oil from -- let's just list the countries, madam president -- russia, venezuela, iraq, saudi arabia. i mentioned iran. it's poorly drafted and damaging to our security. instead, we have got an opportunity today to help our military and our country. this is how we move forward. this isn't about an environmental agenda or some kind of a green conspiracy. it's about doing the right thing, supporting our military brass and establishing a stronger national security and energy security posture in the years ahead. i urge my colleagues to support my amendment to strike section 313. mr. president, as i conclude, i would ask for unanimous consent that senators gillibrand and tom udall be added to my amendment, number 2985 to s. 3254. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. udall: thank you, mr. president. i would yield the floor to my colleague from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: it's my understanding the senator has a timing thing which he would like to have five minutes before my time begins. that's acceptable. first i would look to ask unanimous consent that cap
to russia and deputy secretary of state. it's going to be coming out in mid december. it will be recorded to congress and i understand it will be very, very tough on the state department for not ramping up security which many people believe could be the real issue not what was said on sunday morning television. the white house is fighting for her. >> so andrea, i just am confused but maybe you can help straighten this out. i would think lindsey graham and senator mccain for sure -- i'm not sure about kelly ayotte, have been on sunday morning shows many, many, many times. and i'll leave it there and not even go to the point that maybe at times they might have said things that they, you know, weren't completely confirming. >> what they are suggesting is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. that's what lindsey graham suggested, and they were trying to mislead the american people. >> again, mike barnicle, i've asked this question before, did john mccain say that colin powell was unfit to continue as secretary of state after the information that he gave b
with russia and mull doe v.a. the house has a public hearing later this week on the libya attack, and house republican leaders will also be going to the white house on friday. house democratic leader nancy pelosi joins steve israel to introduce a new house democrat, new house democrats who were elected this month. these members will take office in january, and c-span is scheduled to cover this briefing live at 2 eastern right after the house gavels out. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video. let president obama know what's the most important issue he should consider in 2013 for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grades 6-12, and the deadline is january 18, 2013. go online to studentcam.org. >> what i like about c pan's coverage is -- c-span's coverage is it's in depth. often times you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch "the communicators," i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that
with disabilities act was adopted, we had people from many countries come here. i can think of both first russia, then it was greece, ireland, great britain, a number of other countries came here to learn what we had done and then to pick it up and move forward in their own countries. our legal framework influenced the substance of the convention and is informing its implementation in the 125 countries, i think, that has signed the -- that has ratified it along with the european union. my staff was involved in 2002 when the u.n. first broached this subject of coming up with a convention, and in turn provided to them the substance of the americans with disabilities act, its history, its provisions and what had been done from its adoption in 1990 until 2002, and the changes that it had brought about in our own country. so really, the americans with disabilities act really informed and laid the basis for what the u.n. began to do in 2002 and completed in 2006. so again, i'm very grateful to the leadership of senator kerry, senator mccain, also senator dole who i know is -- is not able to be with us
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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